Saturday, April 29, 2017

Mythology and Fairy Tales

  • Khaemweset
    Khaemweset (also given as Khaemwaset, Khaemwise, Khaemuas, Setem Khaemwaset, c. 1281-c.1225 BCE) was the fourth son of Ramesses II (1279-1213 BCE) and his queen Isetnefret. He is the best known of Ramesses II's many children after the pharaoh Merenptah (1213-1203 BCE). Khaemweset is regarded as the "Egyptologist Prince" and the "First Egyptologist" for his efforts in preserving ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Friday, April 28th, 2017
  • Heracles and the Mares of Diomedes: Greek Hero VS Man-Eating Beasts
    By now, you’re probably aware that the Greek hero Heracles (a.k.a. Hercules) had to complete twelve arduous labors as retribution for killing his wife and kids in a divinely-induced rage. The eighth of these involved tackling some man-eating horses that wanted to take a bite out of pretty much everyone. Read moreSection: NewsMyths & LegendsEurope ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient OriginsPublished on Friday, April 28th, 2017By Carly Silver
  • Beowulf
    Beowulf is an epic poem composed in Old English consisting of 3,182 lines. It is written in the alliterative verse style, which is common for Old English poetry as well as works written in languages such as Old High German, Old Saxon, and Old Norse. Beowulf is considered one of the oldest surviving poems in the English language. The author of the poem is unknown and is generally referred to simply ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Friday, April 28th, 2017
  • The Negative Confession
    The Negative Confession (also known as The Declaration of Innocence) is a list of 42 sins which the soul of the deceased can honestly say it has never committed when it stands in judgment in the afterlife. The most famous list comes from The Papyrus of Ani, a text of The Egyptian Book of the Dead, prepared for the priest Ani of Thebes (c. 1250 BCE) and included among the grave goods of his tomb. ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Thursday, April 27th, 2017
  • Spiritual Defense – Execration Rituals in Ancient Egypt
    Magic was an integral aspect of life in ancient Egypt. The world was created through the power of heka (magic) as Atum stood on the primordial mound of the ben-ben in the middle of the endless waters of chaos with the god Heka, who personified magical power. It was Heka who allowed for the gods to perform their duties through heka and, most importantly, maintained the concept of ma'at, harmony ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Wednesday, April 26th, 2017
  • Death in Ancient Egypt
    To the ancient Egyptians, death was not the end of life but only a transition to another plane of reality. Once the soul had successfully passed through judgment by the god Osiris, it went on to an eternal paradise, The Field of Reeds, where everything which had been lost at death was returned and one would truly live happily ever after. Even though the Egyptian view of the afterlife was the most comforting ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Wednesday, April 26th, 2017
  • Fascinating Facts You Probably Did Not Know About Leprechauns
    The leprechaun is perhaps one of the best-known creatures in Irish folklore. Leprechauns are popularly depicted as little men with beards dressed in green coats and tall green hats. Other well-known beliefs about leprechauns include the pot of gold that they are said to keep at the end of the rainbow, and their mischievous nature. Whilst many are familiar with this general depiction of the leprechaun, there are other aspects of these Irish creatures that ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient OriginsPublished on Tuesday, April 25th, 2017By dhwty
  • The myths embedded in English literature | Letters
    Austen Lynch on Shakespeare’s folk sources and Jan Dubé on the gods that permeate the languageThe Royal Shakespeare Company’s project to celebrate the myth and magic of the influence of Ovid’s Metamorphoses will draw upon the roots of classical culture that undoubtedly run deep in Shakespeare’s plays. But deeper still run the wellsprings of fireside tales imbibed since childhood in the myths and magic of folklore and fairytale. Related: RSC plans celebration of Shakespeare's favourite ... Read more...
    Source: Guardian: FairytalesPublished on Monday, April 24th, 2017By Letters
  • The Mysterious Stories of Castle Ponferrada: Knights Templar, the Camino de Santiago and the lost Sword of Jacques de Molay
    Every pilgrim who is traveling along the French route of the Camino de Santiago, going to Santiago de Compostela, will pass through the Ponferrada in the Spanish section. Most of them have no idea that centuries ago along the same route passed the legendary Jacques de Molay, the last Grand Master of the Templar Order. Did they travel in their famous armors? I don't think so. It is more likely that they wore comfortable clothes, ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient OriginsPublished on Sunday, April 23rd, 2017By Natalia Klimczak
  • Who was the Powerful Amazon Queen Orithyia and What Drove Her to Launch a Fated Attack on Athens?
    Orithyia was one of those dangerous women whose beauty was so often described by terrified and excited men that it became legendary. For centuries, the Amazons were believed to be nothing more than a legend, but nowadays researchers more often accept them as real. The Amazons were like a sensual dream about warrior women, whose exquisite bodies were like dangerous machines and a magnet for the blind desire of men. The remarkable tale of Orithyia ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient OriginsPublished on Sunday, April 23rd, 2017By Natalia Klimczak
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