Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Mythology and Fairy Tales

  • Ryujin
    Ryujin (aka Ryu-o) is the dragon king, sea god, and master of serpents in Japanese mythology. With his magic jewels he is responsible for the tides, and he represents both the perils and bounty of the sea and so was especially relevant to an ancient island nation like Japan. Ryujin is often associated with or considered the same as Owatatsumi-no-kami, another water deity or Shinto kami (spirit ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Wednesday, June 28th, 2017
  • Ancient Japanese & Chinese Relations
    Relations between ancient Japan and China have a long history, and in certain periods the exchange of political, religious and cultural practices between the two was intense. China, the much older state and the more developed, passed on to Japan (sometimes indirectly via Korea) a long list of ideas including rice cultivation, writing, Buddhism, centralised government models, civil service examinations ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Tuesday, June 27th, 2017
  • Kagutsuchi
    Kagutsuchi (aka Hi-no-Kagutsuchi) is the Shinto god or kami of fire and is also known as Homusubi. The son of Izanami and Izanagi, the fire god is the father of eight warrior gods and eight mountain gods, amongst others. Such a destructive force as fire in a culture where buildings were typically made of wood and paper resulted in Kagutsuchi becoming an important object of Shinto ritual and a frequent receiver ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Tuesday, June 27th, 2017
  • Long Barrow
    A long barrow is a class of Middle Neolithic (approximately 3500-2700 BCE) burial monument which is found extensively throughout the British Isles and is related to other forms of contemporary tomb-building traditions of north-western Europe, particularly that of northern France. Essential Features The essential features of a long barrow are: A long either rectangular or trapezoidal mound ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Monday, June 26th, 2017
  • Demons in Your Toilet? Guardians of the Sewers and How They Protected Ancient Latrines
    As a ritual symbol of purification, water plays a key role in the public space of hygiene and sanitary activities as well as in almost all religions past and present. From the first moment mankind invented rituals and deities, the notion of purification was attached to the act of ritual ablutions. The very act of washing was not only about cleaning oneself from dirt - it also freed one from spiritual impurities. Read moreSection: NewsMyths & ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient OriginsPublished on Monday, June 26th, 2017By MartiniF
  • The Romans and their World: A Short Introduction
    The Romans and Their World: A Short Introduction captures the scope and importance of Roman history accurately and briefly. While 250 pages may not be brief to most readers, the scope of the book is to summarize over 1,000 years of history in an efficient manner while taking the time to highlight important events, people, and places - all of which the book does perfectly, and objectively, might ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient History EncyclopediaPublished on Monday, June 26th, 2017
  • Love is a Battlefield: The Legend of Ishtar, First Goddess of Love and War
    As singer Pat Benatar once noted, love is a battlefield. Such use of military words to express intimate, affectionate emotions is likely related to love’s capacity to bruise and confuse. Read moreSection: NewsMyths & LegendsAsia ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient OriginsPublished on Sunday, June 25th, 2017By ancient-origins
  • Was the Heretic Pharaoh Akhenaton in Fact the Father of Modern Monotheism?
    This passage may read like a passage from the Old Testament of the Bible; but, this is a quote from the Hymn of Aten, a work by Pharaoh Amenhotep IV better known as Akhenaton.  This so-called heretic king was the only known Pharaoh in Egyptian history who believed in a monotheistic doctrine when most of the ancient world adhered to polytheism. Read moreSection: NewsHuman OriginsReligionsMyths & LegendsAfricaHistoryFamous People ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient OriginsPublished on Saturday, June 24th, 2017By ML Childs
  • Unearthing Unexpected Fossil Usage in Ancient Medicine (Part 1): Ogre Balms to Dragon Tongues
    Whenever a person thinks of fossils today, lively images of dinosaurs or other primordial beasts emerge within one's mind. Indeed, most people nowadays would connect fossils with museums, excavation digs, or research laboratories. However, people have viewed fossils very differently in the past; usually through wilder... more phantasmic interpretations. Read moreSection: NewsMyths & LegendsAmericas ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient OriginsPublished on Friday, June 23rd, 2017By Legendz Collective
  • Achilles and Patroclus: Brothers from Other Mothers or Passionate Paramours?
    A woman launched a thousand ships. Men traveled far to rescue her, though her motives and intentions were shrouded in haze. But when one warrior quit, it did not take a woman to bring him back to the battleground. It took the death of one very important, sexually ambiguous man to make the war worth fighting for once again. Read moreSection: NewsMyths & LegendsEurope ... Read more...
    Source: Ancient OriginsPublished on Sunday, June 18th, 2017By Ryan Stone
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