Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Genetics and Immortality

  • Cash is falling out of fashion — will it disappear forever?
    (Credit: AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File) On June 27, the ATM turns 50. Former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker once described it as the “only useful innovation in banking.” But today, the cash that ATMs dispense may be on the endangered list. Cash is being displaced in so many ways that it’s hard to keep track. There are credit cards and electronic payments; apps such as Venmo, PayPal and Square Cash; mobile payments services; ... Read more...
    Source: Salon – Innovation – GeneticsPublished on Tuesday, June 27th, 2017By Bhaskar Chakravorti, The Conversation
  • Ransomware attack spreads across Europe, Russia and U.S.
    This Wednesday, May 20, 2015 photo shows server banks inside a data center at AEP headquarters in Columbus, Ohio. Like most big utilities, AEP's power plants, substations and other vital equipment are managed by a network that is separated from the company's business software with layers of authentication, and is not accessible via the Internet. Creating that separation, and making sure that separation is maintained, is among the most important things utilities can do to ... Read more...
    Source: Salon – Innovation – GeneticsPublished on Tuesday, June 27th, 2017By Charlie May
  • Study: The next pandemic may come from bats
    (Credit: Getty/ClaudioVentrella) It seems chiroptophobes may have been right all along. A new article by Nature reveals how scientists who analyzed a broad range of mammalian host-virus relationships discovered that “bats harbour a significantly higher proportion of zoonotic viruses than all other mammalian orders.” That means the potential for a bat-borne viruses to cross over and infect humans is higher than for other animals. Many of the biggest pandemics in human history were zoonotic — meaning, resulting from infectious ... Read more...
    Source: Salon – Innovation – GeneticsPublished on Tuesday, June 27th, 2017By Matthew Rozsa
  • Eye tech: Synthetic iris may revolutionize human eye repair
    Source: Genetic Literacy Project – BiotechnologyPublished on Tuesday, June 27th, 2017By Steven Park
  • Can genetically modified viruses stop antibiotic-resistant infections?
    Source: Genetic Literacy Project – BiotechnologyPublished on Tuesday, June 27th, 2017By Steven Park
  • Working at night may interfere with DNA repair
    A new study explores the effect of night shifts on melatonin levels and DNA repair, as indicated by a chemical byproduct excreted in urine. ... Read more...
    Source: Medical News Today – GeneticsPublished on Tuesday, June 27th, 2017
  • Characterising the mouse genome reveals new gene functions and their role in human disease
    The first results from a functional genetic catalogue of the laboratory mouse has been shared with the biomedical research community, revealing new insights into a range of rare diseases and the ... Read more...
    Source: Medical News Today – GeneticsPublished on Tuesday, June 27th, 2017
  • Common water treatments could damage DNA
    Scientists are warning that a water treatment widely used in developing countries could be damaging the DNA of those drinking it. ... Read more...
    Source: Medical News Today – GeneticsPublished on Monday, June 26th, 2017
  • Meet the horsemen of our environmental apocalypse
    Scott Pruitt; Rex Tillerson; Ryan Zinke (Credit: AP/J. Scott Applewhite/Carolyn Kaster) Consolidation of power by the oil and coal barons began immediately after the election; president-elect Trump’s transition advisors emerged as an oil industry dream team. Despite the initial antipathy between Trump and the Koch brothers, once he secured the nomination, Donald Trump extended the olive branch to the flat earth oligarchs from Kansas. His choice of Indiana Governor Mike Pence as running mate was ... Read more...
    Source: Salon – Innovation – GeneticsPublished on Sunday, June 25th, 2017By Robert F. Kennedy Jr.
  • Reducing the harm done by substances: key strategies
    The most recent data on life expectancy for the United States show stagnation over the past three years. This stagnation has happened at a time when the most important causes of death, such as cardiovascular diseases or cancers, have decreased. So, what causes of death are responsible for the stagnation in life expectancy? This can best be seen in the sub-population of middle-aged white non-Hispanics who have experienced increasing mortality rates and decreasing life expectancy ... Read more...
    Source: Oxford University Press – Science and MedicinePublished on Sunday, June 25th, 2017By Priscilla Yu
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